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5 Simple Tips to Help you Reconnect to Your Food

Are you concerned we are becoming out of touch with the food we eat?  A knowledge of the land used to be essential for survival, but in the past 100 years with the advent of grocery stores and convenience food it would seem this is no longer necessary.  However in recent years, we are beginning to understand just how vital this connection is.

Lets explore 5 simple ways we can reconnect to our food:

Farmer’s Market

A great way to reconnect to your food is to understand where it comes from.  In Bozeman we are have lucky to have a winter and summer farmer’s market where we can get to know the wonderful local farmers in our area.  Go ask questions and take a visit to their farm, you will find you have a greater appreciation for your food when you know the people who have grown it.

Herb Gardens

If you are new to gardening or live in an apartment without a balcony this is a great place to begin.  Start with a few herbs that you use frequently in you culinary endeavors.  Buy a mortar and pestle and soon you will be grinding fresh herbs for your favorite soups and other dishes.  This is also a great project for kids to learn about plants, the responsibility to taking care of them and learning where food comes from.

Balcony Gardens

If you live in an apartment with a balcony, growing fresh greens is easier than you think.  There are numerous website devoted to balcony/pot gardening that offer tips and techniques to help you grow your own urban garden.  Even a small patio and a few plants can provide summer long fresh greens.  Visit www.urbanorganicgardener.com for tips on how to grow your own balcony garden.

Plant your own Backyard Garden

If you have the land available try growing your own garden, you would be surprised how much you can grow even in a small yard.  Talk to your local gardening store to learn which crops grow best in our climate and start germinating seed indoors while you wait for the ground to thaw.

Join a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture)

This is a popular way for consumers to buy local, seasonal food directly from a farmer.  In a CSA you purchase a share/membership in the farm and in return receive a box  of seasonal produce each week throughout the farming season.  Typically the share consists of vegetables, but other farm products may be included such as meat, eggs or flowers. You can read more about and find a local CSA at www.localharvest.org

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